West Texas Talk

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West Texas Talk features interviews with community members discussing issues that affect our region, along with upcoming local programs and events. You’ll hear from local and visiting, artists, musicians, authors, scientists, and other interesting personalities.

The program is broadcast on 91.3 FM each Thursday at 6:00 PM and each Friday at 9:00 PM. We welcome your comments and your suggestions for interview guests at info@kxwt.org

 

Recently on West Texas Talk:

Thursday, Jul 19, 2018:
TSCRA President Bobby McKnight on Ranching in West Texas and Its Future

On this episode, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association president Bobby McKnight speaks to Elise Pepple.

McKnight talks about his life growing up in West Texas, ranching and its future. He also discusses what he says are misconceptions of the industry and the latest news for TSCRA.

Thursday, Jul 12, 2018:
Ed Pavlic on His Forthcoming Novel, “Another Kind of Madness”

On this episode, Travis Klunick speaks to Lannan resident Ed Pavlić about his forthcoming novel, Another Kind of Madness.

Pavlić has written eight collections of poetry and two critical studies. He is a professor of English and African American studies at the University of Georgia.

The writer will read at the St. George Pavilion on Sunday, July 15 at 7:30 pm.

Friday, Jul 6, 2018:
Part Two: Stories from Legacy Storytelling Workshop

On this episode, we hear personal stories crafted at the Legacy Storytelling Workshops. The project is a pilot venture of the Midland Storytelling Festival geared toward encouraging people to tell their own stories.

The workshop was facilitated by resident storyteller Sue Roseberry who provided instruction on the process of sharing the stories and coaching on story selection.

The first story on this episode is told by Cyndi Hill.  She is a wife and mother who loves to read, bake, and garden.  

The second story comes from Jane Holt. She’s the Manager of the Midland Centennial Library and serves on the Midland Storytelling Festival Board of Directors. Her story focuses on a summer at her grandparents’ mink ranch. 

Thursday, Jul 5, 2018:
Part One: Stories from Legacy Storytelling Workshop

On this episode, we hear personal stories crafted at the Legacy Storytelling Workshops. The project is a pilot venture of the Midland Storytelling Festival geared toward encouraging people to tell their own stories.

The workshop was facilitated by resident storyteller Sue Roseberry who provided instruction on the process of sharing the stories and coaching on story selection.

The first story on this episode is told by author Ellen Goldberg. She talks about a summer at The Parkway Inn in 1963.

The second story comes from retired educator Betty Ann Prentice. She volunteers for a number of boards and organizations that promote the arts in Midland Community. Her story focuses on her experience in the Girls Scouts, and what it meant to her.

Tomorrow we’ll hear from Cyndi Hill and Jane Holt.

Thursday, Jun 28, 2018:
Zero Tolerance, Family Separation, and the Path to Reunification

On this episode, Diana Nguyen speaks to fellow reporters Sally Beauvais and Carlos Morales about the zero-tolerance policy, family separation, and the path to reunification.

Continue reading

Thursday, Jun 21, 2018:
Stephen Motika

On this edition of West Texas Talk, Laura Copelin speaks with Lannan poet-in-residence Stephen Motika – His first book of poems, Western Practice, was published by Alice James Books in 2012.

Motika is also the author of three poetry chapbooks: Arrival and at Mono(2007), In the Madrones (2011), and Private Archive (2016); editor of Tiresias: The Collected Poems of Leland Hickman(2009); and co-editor of Dear Kathleen: On the Occasion of Kathleen Fraser’s 80th Birthday (2017).

His articles and poems have appeared in Another Chicago MagazineBOMBThe Brooklyn ReviewThe Constant CriticEleven ElevenMaggyThe Poetry Project NewsletterStaging Ground, and Vanitas, among other publications.

Thursday, Jun 14, 2018:
Maestra Tequilera Bertha González Nieves and Journalist Alfredo Corchado

On this episode we hear from the world’s first woman to become a certified maestra tequilera. Bertha González Nieves started the small batch tequila company Casa Dragones in 2008, with the hopes of elevating how people consume and think about tequila. Since then, the brand has gained a loyal following.

“We’re trying to open the curtain and showcase, really, the sophistication of Mexico,” says González Nieves.

In this conversation, González Nieves talks about how she began working in the tequila business, and how she hopes her projects shape the contemporary understanding of Mexico.

 

We also talk to journalist Alfredo Corchado about his book Homelands: Four Friends, Two Countries, & the Fate of the Great Mexican-American Migration. 

Corchado discusses his experience of emigrating to the United States as a child, and how his experience as an immigrant growing up in the Southwest influenced his perspective as a journalist. His work questions a reality for many immigrants – was the sacrifice worth the lives they build in the United States? 

Thursday, Jun 7, 2018:
Director of the Center for Big Bend Studies Andy Cloud

On this episode, we talk to Andy Cloud, the director for the Center for Big Bend Studies. He discusses the importance of the Genevieve Lykes Duncan Site, where archaeologists have unearthed artifacts that shed light on the Paleoindian way of life in West Texas.

Cloud also talks about the center’s partnership with Mexico’s Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH). He hopes bi-national cooperation will give archaeologists a better sense of life that has existed on both sides of the border.

“As we look at different cultures through time, in similar locations, we do see similar situations. As a modern day cultures, we’re going to face some of the same things because of the same geography,” Cloud said. “It’s hard to know where you’re going if you don’t know where you’ve been.”

Thursday, May 31, 2018:
Lannan Resident Claire Vaye Watkins on Deserts and Her Mom

On this episode, Rachel Monroe speaks to writer Claire Vaye Watkins about her upbringing, growing up in California, and her mother’s influence on her writing. She is the author of the novel Gold Fame Citrus and the short story collection Battleborn

Claire Vaye Watkins will read at the Crowley Theater on Sunday, June 3 at 6 pm.

Thursday, May 24, 2018:
Lannan Resident Elmaz Abinader on Writing the Personal into the Political, and Growing Up Arab American

On this episode, Sally Beauvais speaks with writer Elmaz Abinader about her family’s dislocation from Lebanon to the United States, and how that has informed her work.

Abinader is an award-winning author of two volumes of poetry, This House, My Bones and In the Country of My Dreams, and a memoir, The Children of the Roojme: A Family’s Journey from Lebanon. She’s also written plays that uncover personal narratives of Arabs living through political trauma.

She teaches at Mills College in Oakland, CA and is co-founder of the Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation, which holds annual workshops for writers of color.

Abinader will read at the Crowley Theater on Sunday, May 27 at 6 pm.